Category Archives: Uncategorized

redesign | news: The Washington Post

The Washington Post | May 15, 2015

Why Google and Facebook won’t suffer the same fate as AOL

Our CEO, Rakesh Agrawal, writes for The Washington Post on why Google and Facebook won’t suffer the fate of AOL.

With Verizon finally putting an end to the misery of AOL’s decade and a half long decline, some are wondering whether today’s juggernauts — Facebook and Google — will face the same fate. The answer is unequivocal: No.

To understand why, it’s helpful to look at why AOL went from being the No. 1 Internet provider in the country to a has-been outpaced by companies such as Facebook and Google. Facebook is worth more than 50 times the acquisition price for AOL. Google nearly 100 times.

redesign | bio: Chuck Marshall

Chuck Marshall

Who am I?

I’m a consumer protection lawyer. A class action specialist. I’m a true believer in the successful intersection between great products and great consumer experiences. Unfortunately, the marketplace is not always a fellow believer. Connect button
As a result, I spent 15 years fighting for the little guy against some of the largest corporations out there, trying to force that nexus. I also spent several years on the corporate side, representing companies such as Wells Fargo and Bank of America, defending against class actions that would have forced changes benefiting neither consumers nor corporations. After all these years, one point of clarity is that consumers and corporations would be better off working with each other before the lawyers come out.

Why I chose redesign | mobile

Read more…

Welcome to redesign | mobile

Welcome to redesign | mobile, a new kind of marketplace.

redesign | mobile was born of my frustration with the difficulty in finding professionals for hire, especially for quick questions and small one-off projects. Finding a lawyer, user interface expert, SEO, small business guru can be difficult. Even if you find one, it’s hard to judge the quality beforehand. The time and cost to negotiate an agreement is enough to prevent a lot of questions from being asked and a lot of answers from being given.

I’ve looked for attorneys in the past to review a document. The representation agreement was twice the length of the document I wanted them to review! Paying them was equally difficult, as they only accepted checks. If you have a 10-minute question, it’s not worth the overhead to go through this process.

redesign | mobile is changing that. We provide a way to connect with qualified professionals quickly. We check their academic credentials and professional certifications.

More importantly, you can read expert analysis by the professionals before you pay a penny.

If you decide to pay, you can easily use a credit card online.

Our initial focus areas are:

  • Consumer technology
  • Personal finance
  • Travel
  • User interface design
  • Apple products and design
  • Law
  • Retail experience design
  • Payments technology
  • Freelance writers

These reflect the expertise of our contributors.

Have a service that you’d like to provide? Email amy@redesignmobile.com. Do we already have providers in your space? Not to worry. We want to connect exceptionally smart people with those looking for help. We’re always happy to have more.

redesign | travel: Travel gear 2007 vs. 2015

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I’ve been traveling all of my professional life. As the years have passed, so have the tools I use when I travel.

Here are my 2007 travel gadgets:

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And now:

IMG_20150111_101218Many of the things in the top picture have been consolidated into my iPhone 6:

  • Garmin navigation GPS/Palm.
  • Garmin hiking GPS.
  • iPod.
  • Phone.
  • USB sticks (I just mail or cloud the contents).

Others have been obviated by technology. I no longer carry Ethernet cables or the router to provide WiFi for me.

My current line up includes:

  • GoPro and accessories. (This is a ski trip; not taken for pure business trips.)
  • A bunch of cables and accessories stored in a GridIt.
  • A Lumix DMC-FZ70. 60x optical zoom FTW. (Don’t usually bring my DSLR.)
  • A power strip. Great for sharing power with others at airports.
  • A SOL Republic Punk speaker. (It’s smaller than a Jambox.)
  • A nano SIM cutter. I use this only on international trips, but it’s small enough to leave in my travel bag.
  • Car power adapter. Always be charging!
  • A 5-port USB charger. Always be charging! This one has a separate cable to deal with tricky hotel room situations.
  • Massive Mophie. Always be charging!
  • LiveScribe 3. It’s the real deal for note taking and syncs great with Evernote.
  • An Asus Chromebook. Unlike my MacBook Air, I won’t be heartbroken if I lose it at security.
  • iPad mini 3.
  • iPhone 6.

I’d probably ditch the Chromebook, but Google gives you 12 free gogo passes with each Chromebook. That alone is worth more than the cost of the Chromebook. Having it lets me stay productive in the air.

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redesignAnswer: Paper statements are more convenient

From Skitch (6)

I’m not a Luddite (clearly). I’m an environmentalist.

But the process for getting online statements is convoluted. Every bank has their own log in system. Everyone has their own archiving rules. Sometimes the format online doesn’t include the same information that the paper statement does.

It’s not hard to miss a statement alert in your email along with the hundreds or thousands of emails you get a month. This could easily lead to a pile of late fees and interest charges. Some issuers do a good job of identifying auto pay in their e-statements; some do a terrible job.

It’s next to impossible to search across the statements from issuers. Ironically, I scan all the paper that is sent to me and then shred them. (I scan them into Evernote to make them easily searchable.)

The paper also serves as a reminder that I need to pay the bill.

What would get me to move to digital statements?

  • If I could get them in secure email, just as easily as I get them in the physical mailbox. 
  • Better design of online statements.
  • An easier way to access them.

redesignAnswer: Paper statements are more convenient

From Skitch (6)

I’m not a Luddite (clearly). I’m an environmentalist.

But the process for getting online statements is convoluted. Every bank has their own log in system. Everyone has their own archiving rules. Sometimes the format online doesn’t include the same information that the paper statement does.

It’s not hard to miss a statement alert in your email along with the hundreds or thousands of emails you get a month. This could easily lead to a pile of late fees and interest charges. Some issuers do a good job of identifying auto pay in their e-statements; some do a terrible job.

It’s next to impossible to search across the statements from issuers. Ironically, I scan all the paper that is sent to me and then shred them. (I scan them into Evernote to make them easily searchable.)

The paper also serves as a reminder that I need to pay the bill.

What would get me to move to digital statements?

  • If I could get them in secure email, just as easily as I get them in the physical mailbox. 
  • Better design of online statements.
  • An easier way to access them.

redesignAnswer: If this chart started with 0 on the Y axis, the line would be flat

 

screenshot2

 

At first glance, this graph implies that U.S. cash transaction volume is plummeting. But look at the right side. The axis starts at $1,300 billion. If this graph had 0 on the Y axis, the line would essentially be flat. As posted, the graph is highly misleading.

Not using zero as the basis of the Y axis can be useful in certain cases, like analyzing short-term price movements in a stock. But this is a terrible use of it. Or maybe it’s a great use — because the writer wants to make a point unsupported by the data. But it’s still wrong.

Bonus error pointed out by a reader: The “We Are Here” line shows us between 2013 and 2014. We’re between 2014 and 2015.

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redesignAnswer: Crate and Barrel should stagger delivery of catalogs

I received the catalogs from Crate and Barrel and CB2 on the same day. 

It’s better to spread that delivery out over multiple days because it increases the likelihood that I’d look at one of them. On the same day, it’s possible that I’m on vacation and come back to a pile of mail, my (hypothetical) spouse picks up the mail and tosses it out, etc. Spreading the delivery out doubles the chance that I’ll look at it.

To address some other comments from readers:

  • Crate and Barrel and CB2 can’t hide that they’re the same brand. Well, they don’t try to hide it anyway. All of the multibrand retailers don’t try to hide it. Crate and Barrel/CB2/LandofNod, Williams-Sonoma/Pottery Barn/West Elm, Banana Republic/Gap/Old Navy/Piperlime/Athleta. There is often cross promotion. And some customers shop multiple brands. e.g. I shop Crate and Barrel and CB2, Banana Republic and Gap, Williams Sonoma and Pottery Barn.
  • It’s a waste of paper. Sure, many people would consider it a waste of paper. But these catalogs are expensive to produce and distribute. If they didn’t work, they wouldn’t be used. I browse these catalogs while on the toilet. It’s a lot easier to skim through a catalog with rich visuals than the equivalent online experience.
  • My recent customer-service issues with Crate and Barrel. Some recalled that I had a bad in-store experience at Crate and Barrel where the clerk insisted on a physical address for a store pickup. After some back-and-forth, I gave my address as 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, DC. Although the White House might receive my catalog as a result, I got these catalogs because I have a Crate & Barrel credit card. (Possible future quiz: why do I have a Crate & Barrel credit card?)

 

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