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Foursquare 3.0 takes mobile ball to a whole new level

9 Mar

I remember seeing Dennis Crowley at SXSW in 2009 shortly after he had finished a panel on location services. He was on the phone and giddy that they had just reached 3,000 users. Two years and more than 7 million users later, foursquare’s latest pivot is its most important.

Foursquare 3.0 is the most efficient way to get recommendations for places to go in a city. The new release hits many of the themes that I’ve covered in my series on local search, especially user and merchant engagement and the importance of recommendations. (See How the battle for local search will be won for an overview.)

Lately, foursquare has been afflicted by a form of reverse network effects. It’s become so popular among some segments that the game elements of foursquare weren’t appealing to many users. Most people don’t want to play games that they will suck at. When you check in somewhere and see that you’ll need 28 more visits to become mayor, there’s less incentive to participate. (See this discussion of two-sided markets.) In my research, I found that the average number of check ins per unique user at businesses was 1.56. Given that some places require 12 or more checkins in 60 days to become mayor, that’s a clear indicator that repeat checkin activity is being driven by a very small number of people.

Recommendations

In foursquare's new Explore tab, the recommendations clearly explain why a business was selected. In this example, my "friend" Portland Monthly magazine has left a tip.

In foursquare's new Explore tab, the recommendations clearly explain why a business was selected. In this example, my "friend" Portland Monthly magazine has left a tip.

Foursquare added a new “Explore” tab that provides recommendations of nearby businesses. Recommendations provide a real incentive to use foursquare even if you have no shot at becoming mayor. Foursquare will filter through thousands of local businesses to identify those that you might be interested in. (See my post on recommendation engines.) Much like Google’s Hotpot, recommendations come from a number of different sources:

  • Your friends. If you have friends on foursquare, you’ll see tips that they’ve left at businesses. Because you can friend or follow organizations, this can also show you “expert” recommendations.
  • A place graph. Places will be suggested based on other places that you’ve been.
  • Popular places on foursquare.
  • Preferred categories.
  • Time of day.

It is really easy to scroll through the recommendations. Unlike Yelp and Hotpot, you don’t have to flip back and forth among pages. Unlike Hotpot, non-recommended places aren’t mixed into this list.

Are the recommendations perfect? No. Recommendations never are. I’ve gotten plenty of bad recommendations when talking to friends or hotel concierges. But they sure beat scrolling through an undifferentiated list with no guidance at all.

There are two areas for improvement:

The explore view doesn’t incorporate pictures. This will be an increasingly important part of local search. Visuals are a critical element of how people make decisions, especially when it comes to restaurants and nightlife.

With the new recommendations, foursquare would benefit from a much broader social graph. Many people are stricter about who they will become friends with in foursquare because of its real-time nature. But they really don’t care if other friends, co-workers and acquaintances see tips from visits in the past. In my case, I’ve only friended half of the potential Facebook friends on foursquare. These additional people would dramatically improve coverage of social recommendations.

Specials

Deals are an important part of the new app. Although foursquare deals have been around for nearly two years, they get a big makeover in Foursquare 3.0. The new application makes specials more prominent in the user interface. A big challenge with the old specials was that mayor deals were out of reach for many consumers and didn’t provide an incentive for trial. See my post, Maximizing the value of deals on Facebook and foursquare.

Four new deal structures allow for better serving both end user and business needs:

  • Flash specials. These are the equivalent of door busters. Once activated, the first X people who check in can claim the deal. These are also especially well suited for use as yield management tools. Slow night at the bar? Offer a special for one night only.
  • Friends specials. Check in with a set number of friends to get the deal. These promote behaviors that are important for foursquare’s growth. They serve as both user acquisition tools and product improvement tools. The more friends that you have actively using the platform, the more useful the recommendations become.
  • Swarm specials. These kick in after a certain number of foursquare users check in at a place. These could be important for future friend discovery tools.
  • Newbie specials. These specials allow businesses to incent trial by new customers. Because they are tied to a relatively persistent identity, they can be much more generous than paper coupons (which might be abused by unscrupulous customers).

As important as a deal platform is, having actual deals is critical. Foursquare is launching the new platform with deals from Barnes & Noble, H&M, Toys R Us, Arby’s, Coffee Bean, H&M, Sports Authority, Whole Foods, Chili’s and Radio Shack.

There’s no word on notification regarding specials. Foursquare currently requires users to actively seek them out within the app. Being able to get alerts of new specials (especially flash specials) will be important.

Foursquare claims more than 250,000 businesses on its platform. This is quite a bit less than the 4 million businesses claimed by Google Places. 5% of businesses I looked at had claimed their foursquare presence, compared with 61% on Google and Yelp.

Best is yet to come

As much as I like foursquare 3.0, there is a lot of opportunity left. The biggest of this is collecting more data to make better, more intelligent recommendations. Foursquare will be launching a new partnership with American Express at SXSW. The initial scope is limited to special offers for AMEX cardholders.

AMEX has the absolute best data of any company in America on where a large portion of the population transacts. Consider these pieces:

  • Many businesses set up a merchant account ahead of time, so they know when a business is going to open.
  • They can estimate hours of operation with reasonable accuracy. (Based on swipe data.)
  • They know the average purchase amount.
  • They know the mix of locals vs. out-of-towners.
  • They know the mix of personal cards vs. corporate cards.
  • They know if a business goes out of business. (The swipes stop happening.)
  • They know which businesses people return to and which they don’t. (Implicit quality rating.)

All of this data could be fed into a recommendation engine like foursquare’s.

A hypothetical foursquare AMEX.

A hypothetical foursquare AMEX.

With the way AMEX issues secondary cards, it would be possible to create a card that would automatically check you in on foursquare when you swipe your card. (While protecting your privacy on other purchases.)

At the extreme, you could have a co-branded foursquare card designed around social features. These could include automatic check ins, cardmember specials and a rewards program based on purchase and check in activity.

Sound crazy? Maybe. But back in the mid 2000s, AMEX launched city-centric cards for New York (IN:NYC) and Los Angeles (IN:LA) in a bid to attract younger customers. These cards weren’t successful and are no longer available.

But back then, foursquare didn’t exist.

Part 1: Local search is starting to get more social
Part 2: How the battle for local search will be won
Part 3: Google Hotpot a strong competitor to Yelp
Part 4: Statistics on business and consumer engagement in local search
Part 5: Foursquare 3.0 takes mobile ball to a whole new level

See also:

 

Local search is starting to get more social

21 Feb

Part 1: Local search is starting to get more social
Part 2: How the battle for local search will be won
Part 3: Google Hotpot a strong competitor to Yelp
Part 4: Statistics on business and consumer engagement in local search
Part 5: Foursquare 3.0 takes mobile ball to a whole new level

Social search has been talked about for several years now as the wave of the future. We’ll get better information with the help of our friends. Local is the ideal place to prove that out:

  • Most people tend to have a lot of friends in their immediate area.
  • Local search revolves around everyday experience.
  • The “answers” are based on opinions.

Google’s entry into the space is Hotpot, a local ratings and recommendations tool. It is spending a significant amount of money to promote Hotpot in the Portland and Austin markets.

Hotpot is clearly meant to compete with Yelp. To a lesser degree, it competes with Facebook Places and foursquare. (It’s funny how much the local search space has changed in the last few years. AOL, Mapquest, CitySearch and newspaper Web sites have largely dropped off the local map in recent years.)

It’s important to set the context in this fight: Google is already the undisputed leader in local search. Despite the attention that other sites get, Google is the number one place people go to get local information. More than 20% of Google queries are local in nature. Google Search serves about 170 million users. I bet 99.99% of them have done a local query. Yelp serves 26 million users in the United States. But many of those users come through the Google front door. (Partly because Yelp is one of the best SEOs out there.)

There are two core problems to be solved in local search. Providing someone additional information on a business whose name they know and providing guidance to those who are open to suggestions on a business.

Business name searches

The first problem is largely solved, despite the fact that the scope of the problem has increased. Just a few years ago, it meant providing someone the name, address, phone number and a map for a business. Today, it increasingly includes providing hours of operation, attributes such as romantic, kid-friendly, links to make reservations and menu information.

Distribution and integration helps Google capture business name searches. You can use the browser’s search box and Google.com to get your answer. With an Android phone, it’s even simpler. Press a button, speak your search and the answer appears.

Google can answer most of the basic questions about many businesses in the United States. Yelp has the best data out there for restaurants and bars in the United States. I’ll get to the reasons why later.

Google has difficulty with non-standard venues. For example, in Portland, it does poorly with food carts. In most cases, I don’t advocate manually updating a database to address localized concerns. But given the amount of money that Google is spending on promotion in Portland and the importance of food carts in the city’s dining scene, they should follow the advice of an Oregon company and “Just do it.” A basic effort could be done in a day by using online resources. A street team could hit all of the major food cart areas and provide enhanced data such as hours and pictures in a few days. (While also handing out Google stickers.)

Discovery searches

The other core problem in local search is discovery — helping to find an appropriate answer when they only have a few parameters or no clue what they’re looking for. These are the questions like “I want a kid-friendly pizza place nearby.” “I want to go to some place fancy,” “I’m looking for a special night out on the town.”

This is an area that Yelp excels at but Google generally sucks at.  The problem with Yelp (and the opportunity for Google) is that getting the most out of Yelp requires a lot of work from the user. Yelp has an incredible amount of rich data on local businesses. But it’s too much. It’s overwhelming to see hundreds of reviews. Using Yelp also means trusting people you don’t know, whose tastes may be very different from yours. And it means dealing with the snarkiness of reviewers who often spend more time talking about their life stories and girlfriend problems than the business they’re supposedly reviewing.

Yelp has introduced a number of tools over the years to alleviate this problem. It does data summarization across reviews so that you can see at a glance what are the things most frequently mentioned about the restaurant (e.g. popular menu items). You can see a distribution of the ratings to see how consistent a restaurant is. You can also see ratings trends to see if the restaurant is getting better or trending downward.

But often, people just want a few options. Too much choice and too much data is overwhelming. People don’t want to spend 30 minutes figuring out where to go. We’ve been getting recommendations from Amazon and Netflix for decades. “People who liked X also liked Y.” “Based on your previous ratings, here are places we think you’ll like.” This is especially important in mobile, where people are often more hurried and the screen real estate in which to read is limited. That’s what Google is trying to do with Hotpot.

In some ways, this is an easier problem to solve than Web search. If you’re looking up answers for Jeopardy, there is usually only one right answer. And if Google can’t find it, you know right away. For a discovery-oriented local search, there is more than one right answer. And if the answer isn’t what you were expecting, you won’t know for hours and you might not blame Google. (The restaurant might have had an off night.) For more details, see my earlier post about making intelligent recommendations in local search.

Picking the right social graph

In order to make the best recommendations, you need data. You need data from the user about their preferences and you need a good social graph from which to present options. The more data the better.

This is a significant challenge for Google. Other companies in the social space such as foursquare, Gowalla, Quora and Instagram, have piggy-backed off Facebook’s social graph. That’s not an option for Google. And I’m not willing to spam all of my friends to invite them to use Google Hotpot. The advent of Facebook Connect has made such spamming less socially acceptable. As a result, I have exactly one friend on Hotpot — and he’s a Google employee.

Foursquare’s social graph is OK, but it’s a bit small given the current focus on check ins. The number of people who I want to be able to see where I’m at in realtime is fairly small. But I’d be comfortable sharing historical data on reviews and ratings with a much larger audience.

Facebook’s social graph is ideal for this application. It has a lot of personal connections, including both close and loose connections. The loose connections are important because they help provide coverage that you might not have in your tighter friend circle. For example, the data to make recommendations for Indian restaurants in Paris might be from a former colleague who now lives in Paris.

In the next part of this series, we’ll look at some of the key success factors for local search.

Part II: How the battle for local search will be won

Google Hotpot takes a stand in Portland

19 Feb

Google isn’t known for its consumer marketing. If anything, Google is known for not doing much consumer marketing. Given its strong brand and the attention its products get, it hasn’t really had to do much. Put out a product, blog it and sit back while media fall over themselves to cover the launch.

Local is a different beast. Reaching people in local markets takes more effort. And Google sure is making it. Google has put on a full-court press in Portland since December for its Hotpot product. The results are mixed: I like the effort, but it needs more local flavor.

It’s the largest consumer marketing effort I’ve seen Google undertake (the 2010 Super Bowl ad notwithstanding.) It incorporates out-of-home, joint promotions with small businesses, event marketing, social media and online advertising.

It’s also the largest local marketing effort I’ve seen by an internet company since I was at washingtonpost.com in the late 90s. We hosted frequent community events. The Post bought an SUV, expanded it, put in computers (with a satellite internet connection) and drove it around to events at places like the MCI Center.

What is Hotpot?

Hotpot is a ratings and recommendations engine that sits somewhere between foursquare and Yelp. Instead of focusing on getting people to write rich, in-depth reviews like Yelp, Hotpot is trying to get people to quickly rate places and write short reviews. It doesn’t have check in functionality (that’s in Google Latitude), but the space provided for reviews is more similar to foursquare tips than it is to Yelp reviews.

One of my longstanding complaints about local review sites is that they require users to do too much work to figure out where to go. Google hopes to change that by providing recommendations based on your ratings and presumably the ratings of your friends. This post is focused on Google’s marketing activity; I’ve also written a detailed product review of Google Hotpot.

Out-of-home

Google is using a variety of out-of-home advertising channels. The marketing assault begins the moment you step off a plane at Portland International Airport.

A Google places banner at PDX

(This banner is no longer up.)

There’s a transit campaign with wrapped light rail vehicles:

Max light rail vehicle with Google wrap

Max light rail vehicle with Google wrap

Google has also purchased billboards around town promoting various small businesses. I’ve seen a couple of them. They feature photos of the business as well as a Google map.

Split Google places billboard for Pulse Salon

Split Google places billboard for Pulse Salon. Each half is a full-size billboard.

I’ve also seen ads run before movies. It’s been a while, so I can’t remember the creative. Here’s the call to action at the end:

Theater advertising

Getting local businesses onboard

A new-style Google sticker

A new-style Google sticker with an embedded NFC tag. But there's no call to action.

Google has hired local teams to approach businesses and explain Hotpot. They provide businesses with NFC-enabled stickers. I’ve seen these popping up all over town. These stickers have no Places, Maps or Hotpot branding — just Google.

While Google has been effective in getting businesses to put them up, the stickers themselves are ineffective. There’s no call to action — not even an URL. The vast majority of users can’t interact with them because they’re only NFC-enabled. In the U.S., that pretty much means having a Google Nexus S phone. But even if you had an NFC-capable phone, there’s no indication that this sticker can be scanned. Most NFC-enabled cards and devices have an icon with emanating radio waves. Not only does that give people a clear indicator that NFC is present, it inspires curiosity and serves as a subtle call to action.

Ideally the stickers would have both NFC and QR codes. QR codes can be used by millions of devices. NFC is currently used by virtually no one in the U.S. (Including Google’s Hotpot community manager; her Nexus S didn’t have a data plan.)

Compare Google’s sticker with this sticker for Facebook deals. Although Facebook’s sticker is much busier, it has a clear call to action.

The street teams also help businesses claim their own Places page.

Small businesses can also order a variety of Google schwag online for free.

Business giveaways

Google is giving away pints and custom pint glasses at Deschutes Brewery. Just show the bartender the Places app on your Android or iPhone.

Free pints (and pint glasses) at Deschutes

The pint glasses have Google branding on one side and Deschutes branding on the other side.

According to one bartender, they had 2,000 of these to give away and the promotion continues until they run out. One of the challenges with running such promotions is staff training. As a consumer, it’s frustrating when staff isn’t aware of a promotion. That hasn’t been an issue at Deschutes; everyone seems to know about it. I’ve even seen bartenders explain Google Places to customers. One missed opportunity here: the pint glasses should come with a promotional flier explaining Hotpot to new users.

The free pint is restricted to the Red Chair Northwest Pale Ale. (I’m guessing Google gets a break on the retail price for promoting a newer beer.) Deschutes tracks pints given away in its point-of-sale system. It shows up on the receipt as “Hotpot special”.

Oddly, the Deschutes Place page makes no mention of this promotion.

Deschutes also has Google coasters. These don’t seem to be in widespread use. I happened to catch one out of the corner of my eye and asked the bartender to see more. The coasters only have Google Places branding. Unlike Yelp, which punishes businesses for soliciting reviews, Google seems to be encouraging it.

A more recent promotion with Powell’s Books wasn’t as seamless. Google is offering free Klean Kanteen water bottles to anyone who shows up at Powell’s, makes a $10 purchase and shows the Hotpot app. Unfortunately, no one told the Powell’s airport store about it. The staff spent about 20 minutes trying to figure it out, calling corporate and other stores. This is a bad use of staff time and not a great customer experience.

Event marketing

Hotpot community manager Vanessa Schneider at Beer and Blog

Hotpot community manager Vanessa Schneider at Beer and Blog

Google is doing a variety of events in market to promote Hotpot. The events target various audiences including mass market, tech influencers, the young and hip.

Google sponsored an event at a Portland Trailblazers game where it gave away 22,000 T-shirts.

Google had a team at the Mt. Hood Meadows ski resort giving away hats and mittens.

Google picked up the tab for drinks at a beer-and-blog event focused on the Portland tech community. I estimate that 100 people showed up for that. Google’s Hotpot Community Manager, Vanessa Schneider, was at the event. She is based in Mountain View and flies up for the events. I also met several people who live in Portland and are part of Google’s street team. (Technically, they work for a staffing agency.)

Google was actively soliciting feedback on the product. It also announced its free Best Ever concert series in Portland. Google will be showcasing local bands at a rollerskating rink, on a boat and at a university chapel.

Next week, Google is hosting at least 20 people in a box at a Portland Traiblazers game. Tickets were given away using a trivia contest on Twitter. You had to be faster than Watson on the draw; someone usually won right away. (I just missed out.)

Social media

Blogs, Twitter and Quora have been an integral part of the campaign. @Tweeting most Google accounts is like talking into an abyss. Schneider has been active on the hotpot blog, Twitter and Quora. Questions are usually answered very quickly. She also curates and retweets activity by Portlanders related to Hotpot. She also provided a definition of her role.

Social media is also how they’re managing giveaways. For the concert series, concertgoers will need to get wristbands. Locations for picking up the wristbands will be announced on Twitter.

The blog includes guest posts by Portlanders talking about their favorite places in the city.

Print media

Google has been advertising its concert series in the local alternative weekly:

Google Hotpot concert print ad in Willamette Week

Branding is a mess

Google is using a variety of different brands in the campaign: Google, Google Places and Google Hotpot.

  • Google appears on the NFC stickers and pint glasses.
  • Google Places appears on the coasters and some of the OOH pieces, including the airport signage.
  • Hotpot appears on the Deschutes receipts (yes, I consider that part of the branding) and the hats given away.

I haven’t seen it as part of this campaign, but Latitude is another related Google brand that adds to the confusion. Latitude recently added check-in functionality.

While Hotpot has a dictionary definition related to community and sharing, most people I talk to think Google just misspelled hotspot and it’s a service related to WiFi.

The whole thing is a mess and should be made consistent. As I wrote this post, I struggled what to call the thing. If you were confused, blame Google.

Missed opportunities

Food carts in Portland

Food carts like this are a staple of the Portland dining scene. Unfortunately, Google Places has the worst coverage of food carts in its database among the major local players.

Although the campaign isn’t over, there are a few things that I haven’t seen done yet. (It’s possible that I just missed them, but I haven’t seen a record of them.)

  • Portland has a unique food cart culture. While food carts have become popular in many cities, Portland is their Mecca. There are more than 300 of them — many of which never move. A lot of them serve gourmet food and they cover a wide range of cuisines. It would be easy to use Twitter to organize flash mobs at a food cart pod, e.g. “Free youcanhascheeseburger! at Brunchbox for the next 30 minutes.” Other promotions could involve scavenger hunts/ratings-based promotions at food carts. Unfortunately for Google, it has a real product problem here. Google Places coverage of food carts is the worst I’ve seen in the space. Foursquare, Yelp and Facebook all have much more comprehensive listings. Bing even has a dedicated food cart finder.
  • Events targeting small business owners. Local is a two-sided market. You need businesses and consumers. Engagement on one side will encourage engagement on the other. I would like to see Google educating businesses about how to use the Internet and Google’s tools. While Google has thrown quite a few events, I haven’t seen anything specific to the business community.
  • OMSI Science Pub. The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry hosts frequent events where speakers talk about technology. The technology behind Google Places is impressive and would make a great topic. (One of the best tech/business talks I’ve heard was John Hanke of Google speaking at Berkeley.)
  • Cycling. Cycling is huge in Portland, with many miles of bike lanes. Reaching out to that community seems like a sizable opportunity.
  • NFC. I’m not sure why Google is placing such a big bet on NFC right now. But if that’s their path, they should consider distributing NFC microSD cards to Android users in Portland so that they can experience the technology.
  • Social interaction among participants. One of the reasons that Yelp has been so successful in getting people to review places is that they’ve built a rewards system that engenders community among Yelp users. They encourage each other to review. Yelp events further this interaction by providing additional glue. It would be interesting to see Google design events that try to do the same.
  • A customized landing page. Google is promoting the “google.com/places” URL heavily in its Portland advertising. What’s the first thing you get when you go there? A giant marker pinned to a map… of San Francisco. Details like that matter.

I have no inside knowledge of how Google structured its campaign, but it feels a little like Google algorithmically determined what businesses to target and developed the campaign without understanding the unique things about Portland. The strategy seems generic and the tactics could be applied in any market. That may be the point, but I think that misses an opportunity to make something really special that exudes “getting it.”

This reminds me of HSBC’s long-running campaign about the importance of local knowledge. They emphasize that despite being an international brand, they understand each of their local markets and how things may seem the same can vary across markets. Google’s efforts could show more knowledge of the local market. This actually doesn’t take as much effort as it sounds — spending a week or two in Portland would have provided the types of ideas I listed above.

HSBC ad

HSBC ad illustrating the value of local knowledge

Cost and effectiveness

Google is clearly spending a lot of money in Portland relative to other marketing efforts in the local space. Based on what I’ve seen so far, it’s probably in the $700,000-$1,000,000 range. A single promotion like the Deschutes giveaway is more than the entire marketing budget for some Google product launches.

Despite Google Maps providing the infrastructure for many of the Web’s local efforts, Google has gotten trounced by Yelp when it comes to ratings and reviews. Unlike Yelp, Google doesn’t have a person in each local market. Campaigns like this are one way to help move the needle.

How effective has it been? It’s too soon to say. But here are a few indicators:

  • The Hotpot Twitter account has about 1,100 followers. A small portion of these are local businesses.
  • When Google tweeted questions for the Trailblazers game tickets, the first answer usually came in within seconds. Each question had around 12-24 unique responders.
  • The pint glasses at Deschutes don’t seem to be flying off the shelves. Even after they added more signage about the promotion, I don’t see a lot of tables with Google pint glasses on them when I visit.
  • When I ask my non-technical friends about whether they’ve seen any Google advertising around town, the answer is no.

Overall, it’s exciting to see Google spend this much effort on consumer marketing and specifically on local. Their efforts will not only help Google, but all of the players in the space.

See also:

Disclosure: I have several good friends who work at Google and went to high school with co-founder and CEO Larry Page. I’ve benefited from free drinks and other Google schwag at various Google promotions in Portland.

<a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/asmythie/5460349242/&#8221; title=”Split Google places billboard for Pulse Salon by asmythie, on Flickr”><img src=”http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5300/5460349242_8f00575b9a.jpg&#8221; width=”500″ height=”237″ alt=”Split Google places billboard for Pulse Salon” /></a>

Geo-enabled Twitter comes alive on Twitter Maps

5 May
Bing's Twitter Maps show you what's going on

Bing's Twitter Maps show you what's going on

I’ve been playing with Bing’s Twitter Maps lately and it’s one of the better implementations of Twitter’s geo APIs that were introduced last fall. It shows tweets and foursquare checkins within the last 7 days plotted on the map. Google Maps recently introduced a similar feature, but it seems to only show items that are fed through Google Buzz (including tweets that people have configured to send to Buzz).

Some future applications of geo-enabled Tweets:

  • Events. For last-minute party goers, a real time view of what’s going on around town, complete with pictures and real-time reactions.
  • Ticket scalping. Rather than walk around for blocks talking to scalpers about what they have, glance at a list of tickets posted. The information transparency would result in a higher price to sellers and a lower price to buyers than what scalpers typically offer. (In my experience at baseball games, scalpers usually ask at least 3x what they paid.)
  • Finding a place to go. When in new cities, it’s often hard to figure out where to go — what are the lively neighborhoods at night. By looking at a map of recent tweets, you could quickly discover where people are still awake.
  • Read reviews from friends. Geo-enabled tweets filtered by those you follow would provide socially relevant recommendations.
  • Offers from local businesses. These could be persistent or distressed inventory. Slow night? Tweet an offer to draw in customers.
  • News. Twitter has long been used for user-generated breaking news. With geo-enabled tweets, breaking news could be aggregated by location in addition to hashtags. The biggest stories could be identified by an increase of tweets from a location (versus normal) and retweet frequency. News from media outlets could also be plotted.
  • Construction and accident information. Avoid bottlenecks by seeing tweets from fellow drivers, DOTs and news sites.
  • Trip sharing. Find others at the airport headed your way, cutting costs and reducing pollution.

And, of course, there’s friend finding, which is the most talked about use of geo-enabled tweets.

So far, the percentage of tweets I see with geo information is tiny (>1% of those I follow). But as more and more geotagged data is put into Twitter, the key will be applications providing the right tools to filter all of that data. At a minimum, we’ll need the ability to filter by time of tweet, people we’re following, hashtag and application (e.g. foursquare).

Unfortunately, bing’s Twitter Maps doesn’t seem to be available where real-time information would be most useful — on mobile devices.

More on: geotagging, social networkingTwitter

Twitter and foursquare: the tipping point to getting local business online

27 Aug
Crepe cart in Seattle

Crepe cart in Seattle

Getting small local businesses to go online has been the holy grail of the Internet. I’ve written before about some of the reasons local business don’t go online and suggested several ways that they could use emerging technologies to get online with minimal effort.

That finally seems to be happening. Whether it’s a crepe cart in Seattle, ice cream store in San Francisco or a restaurant in Sedona, businesses are using the simplicity of Twitter for their virtual presence.

Most local businesses are too busy running their business to exert a lot of effort maintaining an online presence. If it’s not easy, it won’t get done. My favorite example of a small business reusing their existing work is the Webcam pointed at the wall of Beachwood BBQ where they list the pints on tap.

The challenge is that these businesses are only announcing their presence to existing customers or passersby. While this can help drive repeat visits through specials, notices of new arrivals, etc. it does little to bring in new customers.

That’s where foursquare comes in. This location-based social game allows users to “check in” to places they visit. Check in often enough and you become the “mayor” of that place. Savvy businesses have latched on to this and begun offering discounts to their mayors.

It has also been incorporated into the foursquare check in process. When I checked in at a restaurant in Seattle, I was presented with an offer at a nearby bar: happy hour all day for the mayor or $1 off well drinks for anyone else who checked in. (Checking in updates your social network status, providing further exposure for the business.) It’s one of the first examples of location-based mobile advertising that works. The process is a bit cumbersome now, but it provides a glimpse into where the technology is headed.

In addition to providing exposure to businesses, it solves a user problem that local search has long failed at: discovery. People often don’t know what they’re looking for when they’re out. Suggestions, even if they’re sponsored, help fill the discovery gap.

Foursquare offer

foursquare mayor offer

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